I have always considered myself quite a nice person. I like food of all shapes, flavours and colours. From every country and continent. I don’t discriminate, I am an equal opportunity eater. It’s only the doctors who say I’m intolerant. And certain foods who refuse to tolerate me. They certainly refuse to recognise and respect my right to eat them without major physical discomfort and distress.


Gluten and lactose are not my friends.


Despite the negative attitudes surrounding me from many of those I love best, (cakes, ice cream, hot toast) I decided to become a chef. Not always easy when you live in a bread and milk filled world. I like to think that this has helped me become a better person as I embrace my differences and refuse to let the gluten get me down. I believe InTolerance. I am the InTolerant Chef.

Food should not be about what you can’t eat, but what you can and what you enjoy eating. This blog is about my journey of cooking and eating and discovery. It’s not a definitive guide to allergy awareness nor do my intolerances make me an expert. Your body is your responsibility, not mine. I only know what works for me.


I can tell you this..... No glutens were harmed in the making of this website.

April 23, 2013

Anzac Cake For Anzac Day




This week brings the 25th of April, ANZAC Day

ANZAC stands for Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, and Anzac day marks the anniversary of the first major military action fought by Australian and New Zealand forces during the First World War when they landed on the shores of Gallipoli at dawn.

Today we use this day as a day of remembrance, not only of the brave men who fought at that particular time, but for all members of our Armed Forces who have served their country over the years as well.


ANZAC biscuits are one of our Aussie culinary icons. They were included in comfort packages sent to the Boys Over There during the First World War, and have been a legend ever since. So beloved are these biscuits, that despite the name Anzac being protected in both Australia and New Zealand there's a general exemption for Anzac Biscuits as long as they are kept basically true to the traditional recipe and are never named Cookies.

As they're made with hardy ingredients, no eggs, and last well, they were perfect for posting overseas and bringing a bit of love to the troops. My Dad served in Vietnam and Mum would send these across to him, I asked him how this made him feel and he said they made him feel Lonely. There was plenty of company, but these Anzac biscuits made him feel Alone. Homesick is apparently a different feeling, and these biscuits made him feel loved, but also served as a reminder of how far away he was from his family.They bought him real taste of Home.





I realise I'm flying in the face of tradition by naming this cake an Anzac Cake, but Anzac Biscuits are dense and chewy and just not too suitable for dentures and older Veterans teeth. I feel that I've stuck true to the original recipe ingredients, and really the only difference is the addition of a couple of eggs, some milk and the ratio of  the other ingredients. The spirit of the original is the same, and I hope all is forgiven. My Dad said it was alright, so I guess it is after all :)



For all of my overseas Readers who might be unfamiliar with Golden Syrup, one of the main ingredients in these biscuits, according to the Essential Ingredient: Golden Syrup is refinery syrup made from raw sugar filtered through charcoal to give it a clear appearance and delicate flavour. We grew up with it slathered on pancakes, toast, and dripping through the holes in crumpets and off our fingers






Anzac Cake for Anzac Day



150gm Butter or lactose free alternative
2/3 cup Golden Syrup
2 cups gluten free Self Raising Flour
1 1/4 cups lactose free Milk or dairy free alternative
1/2 cup gluten free Oats (you can get the Freedom Foods brand at supermarkets)
1/2 cup shredded Coconut
1/4 cup raw Sugar
2 Eggs



Pop the golden syrup and butter in a saucepan on low heat and melt until it's lovely and combined well together





It smells so yummy indeed! This doesn't need to boil away or anything, just melt through





Put in all the rest of the ingredients- yep, all of them. Just be careful with the eggs as the syrup mix will be hot and you don't want to cook out the eggs just yet





Mix, mix, mix until it's all a smooth and lovely batter





Pour the batter into a greased cake tin, then bake at about 170* for an hour or until the cake springs back when pressed lightly and a skewer comes out clean





Cool the cake in the tin for about 10 minutes to let it firm up and settle a bit





Then place it on a rack to cool completely





Todays baking efforts- allies side by side!




The cake was just lovely. I had been worried that it would be a bit dense and heavy with the oats, but it was really quite light and surprisingly fluffy given there was no sifting or beating involved. The flavour was certainly true to the traditional Anzac Biscuit, just a bit more delicate, and the cake was certainly more denture and false teeth friendly than the chewy, hardy biscuits!

It isn't a show stopper, but it's not meant to be. It probably wouldn't survive posting overseas either, but it's perfect with a cuppa at smoko, or to warm you up after a cold dawn vigil while you wrap your hands around a thermos and watch the sun rise

Lest We Forget




So Dear Readers, will you be attending the Dawn Service this Anzac Day or going to the march, and do you think this cake deserves it's name or should we stick with the pure Anzac Biscuit?








24 comments:

  1. I can just imagine the flavours of that cake.. mMmmmm

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Exactly the same as the classic biscuit Msihua- yummy!

      Delete
  2. Rebecca - this is a lovely post, and so is your cake. It must have made your dad smile!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Ina! I jusst wish he lived closer though...:)

      Delete
  3. A perfect tribute for ANZAC day. I've never had a cake like that but it will be fun trying it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You have to give it a try Maureen, its a nice change from the usual :)

      Delete
  4. What a clever idea! I love your tooth friendly version of the Anzac biscuit! :D

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Lorraine, Dentures can be a real nusiance- so I'm told, and even my daughter has trouble with her braces with chewy things sometimes. Friendly Food For All I say! :) x

      Delete
  5. Both look lovely... with teeth or with out teeth. Actually I've got a hankering for a slab of that cake right now, with a little steaming chai...might have to do some anzac baking tomorrow I think.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, definitely better with Earl Grey Brydie- everything is :)We're finishing it off tonight warmed with lactose free custard- Mmmmmm! :)

      Delete
  6. I didn't know your father fought in Vietnam. Amazing he was able to survive! How lovely of your mother to make these for him - I've heard they're very hardy and are able to stay fresh for longer than the average biscuit. I think they were invented during the World Wars when eggs were difficult to source. Great that you've turned tradition into a cake. I hope your dad has a great day tomorrow xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. He was a career Army officer Charlie, so he went over to do his duty and was decorated for his part in it all. He was very blessed indeed- one day a heap of schrapnel tore through his tent and into his bunk, he would have been killed if he was tucked up in it for the night! I love seeing Dad and the other veterans march :) xox

      Delete
  7. Wow, your parents are young! A lovely post. Watching the dawn services as I write.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are pretty young I guess Lizzy, but they started families earlier back then I guess, we did too but a lot of my friends have waited until their 30's. Doesn't the Dawn Service give you chills when the Lone Piper plays- so moving!

      Delete
  8. A clever twist, darling. And a truly lovely story about your dad - made my heart ache for him.. xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks sweetie! He doesn't talk about it much at all and really had to think hard when I asked him how the care parcels made him feel. He was adamant that HomeSickness is a totally different feeling than Lonely, and I guess I can see what he means xox

      Delete
  9. I find ANZAC day so emotional. Just the thought of what those men and women sacrificed for our today. I absolutely love the sound of this cake. It is a lovely way to celebrate ANZAC day. Would have love a bit of this to nibble at the ceremony this morning.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Sherilyn! It's usually so darn cold here at the ceremony that a thermos and cake is necessay for thawing out :) I love watching the march too, especially going to the small country town ones near our farm- they seem so personal and wonderful

      Delete
  10. Good on you for making a cake in remembrance... I like your reasoning too, I don't even think my nan would appreciate an ANZAC biscuit in her dentures ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Probably not, my Nan liked biscuits that she could dunk until they were practically mush and required no chewing at all :) Thanks!

      Delete
  11. Interesting recipe. Your cake and cookies look absolutely gorgeous. I'm inspired to try it :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Nusrat, I hope you enjoy it as much as we did :)

      Delete